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Green Chile Pozole with Lotus Seeds
soups stews

Green Chile Pozole with Lotus Seeds

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Soup loves seeds too! Especially the lotus seed – a staple in Asian cuisine, mostly sold in its dry, shelled form. Swap traditional Mexican hominy with lotus seeds in this recipe– they’ll soften up while cooking, similar to a bean. Baby bok choy and shiitake mushrooms add to the Eastern vibe.
  • 20m

    prep time

  • 1h 20m

    Cook Time

  • 401

    Calories

  • 17

    Ingredients

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Ingredients

6

Servings

Instructions

  • Mix chili powder, cumin, oregano and sea salt in large bowl. Add pork; toss to coat evenly with spice mixture.

  • Heat 2 tablespoons of the oil in large heavy bottom saucepan (6- to 8-quart size) on medium heat. Add celery, onion and poblanos. Cook 4 to 5 minutes or until vegetables begin to soften. Add shiitake mushrooms, 2 tablespoons of the garlic and 1 tablespoon of the ginger; cook 3 to 4 minutes or until mushrooms are softened. Remove vegetables from saucepan.

  • Heat 1 tablespoon of the remaining oil in the same saucepan on medium-high heat. Add pork and cook until lightly browned on all sides. Return vegetables to saucepan. Stir in chicken stock and lotus seeds.

  • Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer 45 minutes to 1 hour or until pork and lotus seeds are tender.

  • Heat remaining 1 tablespoon oil in large skillet. Add bok choy and remaining 1 tablespoon each of the garlic and ginger. Stir-fry until tender-crisp. Divide bok choy evenly among serving bowls. Ladle Pozole into bowls and garnish with fresh cilantro and lime wedges to serve.

  • Test Kitchen Tip: The lotus seed, also called makhana in India, is a staple in Asian cuisine. Since the harvesting season of the lotus flower is short, the lotus seed is most commonly found dried or puffed. The bitter germ is typically removed from the center of the seed before drying. Both dried and puffed lotus seeds provide an earthy, slightly floral flavor and have a firm, hearty bite when cooked. Lotus seeds are sold in Asian markets, specialty grocers and at many online retailers. Puffed lotus seeds are also sold as flavored snacks.

Nutrition information (per Serving)

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